Overcoming The Stigma Of Disaster Preparation

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Disaster Preparation Mindset

I have been thinking about the negative mindset that surrounds the prepper community by the nature of the topics that we usually discuss. The topics I am referring to of course are all the kinds of disaster, man-made and natural that are our constant companions in many conversations. We often talk about the man-made and natural disasters to come as if there were no hope and it is an absolute forgone conclusion that everything will either be destroyed or completely collapse. That is a place that I don’t believe I/we want to remain permanently.

Yesterday I had an accident and tore a muscle in my thigh and beyond the pain, it sort of made me depressed since I have not been able to be as mobile as I am used to. That minor depression added to the conversation in my head about the focus and tone of this website and I wanted to make sure to include along with all the prepping talk, information and advise, a focus on the real necessity for keeping a good attitude no matter what the circumstances. Falling into a depression serves no one and adds to the difficulty in all situations.

Let’s Prepare To Make Things Better

We preppers seems to be more negative or at least more focused on the negative aspects that either are presently around us or at sometime in the future could be. I would like to offer today the idea that we can know what to do in a disaster and we can be prepared in case something happens but at the same time we can intentionally place our focus on making things better now and in the future. See how that is different? The first is “preparing for the worst” and the second is “preparing to make things better”… just a little change of wording completely shifts our attitude and the energy we put into our situations and our environment.

As I have conversations with other people about disaster, prepping, survival gardening etc and I hear many excuses for not preparing. One of those excuses is that the person just doesn’t want to dwell on what to do in a disaster and constantly think about what could go wrong. That is the reputation that preppers generally have. We are often viewed as a little crazy and obsessed with our prepping activities inside our little dooms day club; sometimes to the point of repulsing others with our prepper badge that we wear so proudly.

I would like to be a voice of reason and balance because I want to be focused on enjoying my life and the preparedness for disaster at the same time. I don’t want to be known for always bringing up the worst possible situation and acting as if that is the only option. Statistically it is just not that likely that the entire structure of our life will fall apart at once. Now, don’t put words in my mouth and say that I don’t believe that things are very bad in our world and look as if they could get worse. I absolutely believe they will get worse but if I adequately prepare, I should be able to survive in most new environments.

Why should I give up my happiness today when I am doing all I can to secure mine and my families future. I have no crystal ball but I will be responsible and prepared. It seems to me that is a healthy way to approach almost any subject and especially one that has the tendency to be so negative.

Remain Optimistic While Preparing For Disaster

It really doesn’t take any more effort to remain optimistic while prepping but it does take a mind shift, a new paradigm, a new way of looking at things. The negative things that we peppers so often like to latch onto can not be allowed to become an obsession. I know it is important to stay on top of current events and even spend time thinking about how those events might play out and have an impact on our daily lives but where we go wrong is when we begin to allow the potential of those events to overshadow all other aspects of our life. I think there is room for a better approach and I am encouraging you and I to take a fresh look.

The effects of shifting our minds will likely be very positive. We might have a more receptive audience as we talk to others. We will be less likely to become overwhelmed with things and the depression that some of us experience from time to time will be held at bay by the knowledge that we are getting ready to make many situations better because we have so effectively prepared ourselves, our friends and our families.

I am aware some people will feel differently than I do and might feel that prepping should be an obsession and it is all that should matter. My argument is we can do both. If we prepare adequately prepping doesn’t have to be 24/7/365.

How do you feel? Am I deluded? Have I lost credibility with my disaster preparation audience? Or do you totally/partially agree with me? Let me know in the comments below.

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

One Response to “Overcoming The Stigma Of Disaster Preparation”

Read below or add a comment...

  1. LP says:

    You’re not deluded. Your credibility should remain intact, at least from my take on it. I don’t subscribe to the all-death, all-wasteland camp except for discussing nuclear warfare scenarios. Optimism is a key prep. Ask yourself this question. Why am I prepping? If your answer is “I want to die fighting”, then you have some issues. My answer to that particular question is, “So I can survive long enough to get back on my feet.” Survive what? The list includes, sickness, job loss, accident, assault and on down to collapse, terrorist attack and nuclear fallout. If the goal is to survive and thrive, then one can not be obsessed with morbidity, right? A guy has to move ahead expected to do well, and be able to help others do well. It’s become somewhat of a common phrase to read “Your most important prep is between your ears”, or some version of that. Keep your head, and while you’re at it, keep your good humor and sense of balance, too. Sounds to me like you have both. To bad my neighbors aren’t like you. I think we’d get along fine.

Leave A Comment...

*